Friday, March 3, 2017

More to the Point


See? I do like pencils. This is the best stylus "pencil" ever from Paper by 53. Have you tried it? Do you like it? I like its traction, its heft and the point offers better control. It's a shame I don't use it more but even Paper by 53 loses to actual paper and pencil.


Levenger's pencil is good for something despite being this short. It came with match cover pads hence the shortness of it all. I sent Erin a pad with the little pencil in its tuck spot, and she wrote back, "What am I supposed to do with this Mama? Write tickets?" I never gave away another set.  The eraser is one of the best. It will honestly undo graphite mistakes without ruining your paper. I cannot help but wonder what they do with the other half of the pencil. They come short and sharpened.


I'd bet my last gold coin (Hey, John Wick!) most of America has more Sanford Eagles in their junk drawers than any other pencil on the planet. It had to have been the only pencil made in the US once upon a time. I wonder if they're still sold. How many do you have? Can you prove it? As you can see I'm holding onto mine just in case the machines take over the world, and the electric pencil sharpeners go on strike to show us what the world will be like without the sharp pointed No. 2 yellow pencil that taught America to print and write cursive. You will never see mine on eBay. 


You knew it was coming, right? The big daddy of yellow pencils, "My First Ticonderoga!" They're all yellow! Wait a minute. Mine were red and mostly blue in grade school. Were yours? Oh, okay. Google "jumbo pencils" to ease your heart. They really were red and blue. Whew!


Then there's Koh-i-Noor'd Trigraph 4B. I seldom use it for drawing. It's there for any-port-in-a-storm moments. Their mechanicals are probably the best ever. So's their sharpener. More about both later.


The day I owned my first Venus Drawing pencils was the day I knew I'd become an artist. I knew I had to learn to draw without erasers. Such a scary thing made me more confident about the marks I made. For years they were all I knew.


Ah, the charcoal pencil. I am forever smitten by the softness, so the extra softness proffered by the General made me even more loyal to the brand. Who is this General? Well, this is how their story goes, in part:  In 1860 ". . . Edward Weissenborn began the first pencil factory in the USA. In 1889, Edward and his son, Oscar A., began what is now General Pencil Company. Still family owned and operated, our goal is to create consistent, quality products in a sustainable manner for artists of all levels." Shucks. All this time I thought a general started selling pencils after a war. He whittled down his wooden leg to make a bunch of pencils that were so great they became earned him his start-up cash flow, and the rest was history. One never knows, do one?


The Moleskin pencil came home early last year.


The idea of a cap impressed me.


As did the bottom. I like that end cap. It's a touch that matters.


Why there are two but only one cap . . . Ah, I see. Both are 2B so there's no sense in using both at the same time. I guess. But the pencil makes you want to keep the extra nearby, since this pencil's body was made for the human hand. Its sole drawback is a need to be just a little bit longer. It rests in an awkward spot against your hand--not quite clearing the necessary height beyond the back of your hand. But it still the potential be be a great bestie. The graphite could be darker. I wrote a letter with it last night. It goes down way too light for human on white ruled paper. 


Something weird is going on with my images. Sorry. I'll take up my Olympus soon. This is the prettiest surprise in Pencildom. It has to be the best little big sharpener that I own. Moleskin done good with this gem. I marvel at what it does with that flat rectangular pencil. More to the point? Using it is a pleasure every pencil user should experience. I hope you'll experience the pleasure someday. Pencil in the Moleskin experience on a page of your to-do planner. 









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